Displaying items by tag: BBC

Thursday, 09 December 2021 20:58

British broadcasting

'We are living in a Christian land', declared one of the BBC’s founding figures at its launch. Broadcasting House, in London, was opened in 1932. Above the central archway in the entrance lobby was a large Latin inscription of their value statement: ‘This Temple of the Arts and Muses is dedicated to Almighty God by the first Governors of Broadcasting. It is their prayer that good seed sown may bring forth a good harvest, that all things hostile to peace or purity may be banished from this house, and that the people, inclining their ear to whatsoever things are beautiful and honest and of good report, may tread the path of wisdom and uprightness.’ This inscription remains in the same place today, and the mission statement is as necessary and relevant as ever. May the BBC and all media outlets be reliable and honest sources of information. May truth be uppermost on all reporting, without speculation or opinions. Pray also for religious broadcasting and light entertainment.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 02 September 2021 22:48

BBC’s admission of bias

Last week, Ofcom publicly withdrew from Stonewall’s Diversity Champions programme, citing as the reason a need to avoid conflict or a risk of perceived bias. They are the latest in a growing list of government departments and public bodies to acknowledge that the advice given by Stonewall is highly partisan, often factually inaccurate, and sometimes misleading. None of this, however, appears to have impacted on the BBC. In a statement issued on 26 August, the corporation defiantly repeated its commitment to workplace inclusion, saying it would remain associated with Stonewall’s LGBTQ+ Diversity Champions’ programme. A sizeable number of BBC staff are deeply unhappy with this. Senior presenters have complained that continuing support for the controversial programme indicates clear bias and partiality, with one commenting, ‘if we’re all being lectured about impartiality, and quite rightly so, why are we signed up to a scheme that is obviously partial?’ 

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 27 May 2021 22:10

BBC to review editorial policies

BBC chairman Richard Sharp said failures of ‘accountability and transparency’ existed until 2020. The BBC will review editorial practices and investigate how journalist, Martin Bashir, was re-hired as religion editor in 2016, after an inquiry found he used ‘deceitful behaviour’ to secure an interview with Diana, Princess of Wales. The BBC accepted the findings and reiterated its apology. The Duke of Cambridge said his mother was failed ‘not just by a rogue reporter’ but by BBC bosses. An enquiry found Bashir had faked bank statements to suggest Princess Diana was under surveillance - to win the trust of her brother Earl Spencer, and eventually gain access to the princess for the 1995 interview. Then as media interest in the interview increased, the BBC covered up its knowledge of how Bashir secured the interview. Now the BBC board ‘hopes to ensure the mistakes of the past could not be repeated’. Pray for truth, humility and justice run through all reporting and commentaries.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 11 February 2021 21:03

Songs of Praise controversy

Christian MP Gregory Campbell has defended his claim that the BBC's Songs of Praise Gospel Singer of the Year Competition was ‘the BBC at its Black Lives Matter worst’. The semi-final featured five black singers and three black judges. He believes the singers were not representative of the best gospel singers in the country, the BBC is not diverse, and the show had ‘one colour scheme’. The presenter of the competition said very few white people applied, and the best singers were chosen. The MP then asked him if he was trying to make him believe there wasn't a single white person good enough when both black and white sing gospel. The presenter said the show celebrated a style of music that came out of black communities and black experience in this country; Campbell's comments show a lack of understanding and ignorance about gospel music.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 28 January 2021 20:57

Education: homeschooling transgender lessons

A BBC programme aimed at nine- to twelve-year-olds claims that there are 'over 100 gender identities'. The film, ‘Understanding Sexual and Gender Identities', is offered on its website as part of its relationships and sex education package for home schooling. It tells children that becoming transgender is a way to be 'happy', while making no mention of the growing legal and medical concerns about the rising number of children saying they want to change gender. When a pupil asks, 'How many gender identities are there?' the teacher replies, 'There are many gender identities. We know we have male and female, but there are over 100 if not more gender identities now. Some people might feel they are two different genders, some might think they are bi-gender. There are some who might call themselves “gender-queer” - like, I don't want to be anything in particular, I just want to be me.'

Published in British Isles
Friday, 03 January 2020 09:59

BBC ‘a secular church’

Conservative peer Charles Moore, as a guest editor on Radio 4's Today programme, said the BBC has a liberal bias: ‘What I am objecting to is preaching.’ He said the BBC is a secular church which tells us what we ought to think about things. Mr Moore had difficulty trying to get information about climate change onto the programme, even though he was the guest editor and should have had a free rein. He said the obstacles came because of bureaucracy and the fact that Roger Harabin, the environment editor, is ‘so biased’. Nick Robinson defended his colleague, stating the BBC is regulated by Ofcom. The director of Affinity, a network of UK churches, said that he has ‘a lot of sympathy’ with Mr Moore; BBC intolerance of any other view causes questioning and framing of questions to be based on a number of presumptions.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 14 November 2019 22:15

Children in Need project

A former Blackburn day school and Sunday School built in 1834 to nurture young people will be able to continue its legacy, thanks to the BBC Children in Need annual appeal. At the parish rooms of St Silas Church (with Pudsey Bear among the congregation), Rev Sheelagh Aston quoted Luke 3:11, ‘Whoever has two coats is to share with him who has none’. She threw out the challenge, ‘What if we did give what we had to others?’ Her comments were just one of many as people once again seek to raise money for Children in Need. By clicking the ‘More’ button you can read more about how Children in Need, DIY SOS, and hundreds of volunteers gave their time to come and serve the community and the church.

Published in British Isles
Friday, 04 October 2019 09:42

Children told: ‘over 100 gender identities’

A BBC teaching video states that there are 100, if not more, gender identities as well as male and female. Among the ‘trusted adult’ speakers is transgender activist Leo Lardie, and the 9- to 11- year- olds appear uncomfortable as she talks about her genitals. She says that people who criticise transgenderism ‘don’t know any better yet’. A gay head teacher tells the youngsters they should not just accept differences between people but ‘celebrate them’. Finally, the children are threatened into conforming by being told that ‘people can go to prison if it is shown they’re disrespecting or being hateful to people because of a difference that person perceives’. Coalition for Marriage said, ‘These claims are nonsensical. The video series is supposed to help teachers deal with sensitive subjects in age-appropriate and honest ways. It does neither.’ Meanwhile a Christian mother is mobilising parents against LGBT lessons.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 30 August 2018 22:12

Anti-therapy film

The BBC's News at Ten recently featured a one-sided report on a film about Christian 'gay conversion therapy'. The Miseducation of Cameron Post is about ‘a gay teenager sent away to a Christian camp that uses prayer and therapy to try to change her sexuality.’ Despite the film clearly being used to agitate for a ban on any kind of therapy, no counterpoint or challenge was made. The programme was designed to promote the film without any attempt to balance its portrayal of the world. In July, the government released an LGBT action plan that included banning ‘gay conversion therapies’ and may press ahead with the idea in the autumn. However a recent study suggested that, at least for religious men, therapy to help move away from unwanted same-sex attraction can be beneficial in a number of different ways.

Published in British Isles
Thursday, 26 July 2018 21:55

Cliff Richard and the BBC

The BBC has to pay Sir Cliff Richard £850,000 to cover legal costs, following his privacy case against them. He had already been awarded £210,000 damages when the court ruled that the BBC infringed his privacy when reporting a 2014 police raid on his home. Sir Cliff was never charged or arrested. The BBC is also going to pay £315,000 to South Yorkshire Police for legal costs. However the BBC is seeking leave to appeal against the judgment, and wants to challenge Sir Cliff’s right to privacy while a suspect in a police investigation - trumping the broadcaster's right to freedom of expression to publish his name and cover the raid. Lord Patten, former chairman of the BBC Trust, said the BBC would be ‘crazy’ to appeal against the High Court's ruling in this case, saying they should ‘swallow hard, say they made a mistake, apologise, as they have, to Cliff Richard and not to do it again’. See https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-44884477/cliff-richard-bbc-would-be-crazy-to-appeal-lord-patten

Published in British Isles
Page 1 of 2